PALA Logo designed by Aleksandra Terlik
:: Nov 19 2014 ::

IRS Approves PALA Tax Exempt Status

The Polish American Librarians Association became a tax exempt organization October 7, when it received official notification from the Internal Revenue Service in a letter dated October 24, 2014. Section 501(c) (3) of the Internal Revenue Code makes gifts to PALA deductible on Federal income tax forms as a charitable donation. “Donors can deduct contributions they make to you under IRC Section 170,” the letter says, and, “You’re also qualified to receive tax deductible bequests, devises, transfers or gifts under Section 2055, 2106, or 2522.”

“We hope that tax exempt status will enable PALA to raise more money for projects and initiatives that will help librarians deliver enriched services to Polish Americans and more fully represent Polish history and culture in library collections,” said Ron Stoch, PALA President. Stoch completed the necessary paperwork earlier this year and submitted the required forms to the IRS in October. “I was surprised and delighted that confirmation of tax exempt status came so quickly and with so little red tape,” he said. “The IRS recently eased the process by putting the forms and instructions online, and we are grateful.”

“While PALA has been a not-for-profit, all volunteer organization for the past five years, tax-exempt status will enable us to be more effective fundraisers,” says PALA Executive Director Leonard Kniffel. For federal income tax, donations are deductible charitable contributions; dues are not considered charitable contributions but may be deducted as an ordinary and necessary business expense, he advised.
:: Oct 15 2014 ::

Son to Lead Book Club Discussion of Leopold Tyrmand’s Diary 1954

The Polish American Librarians Association’s Third Tuesday Polish Book Club continues at 6:00 p.m. November 18 at the Polish Museum of America in Chicago, featuring a discussion in English of Leopold Tyrmand’s controversial Diary 1954 with the author’s son, Matthew Tyrmand. Diary 1954 was published in English this year by Northwestern University Press, translated from the Polish by Anita Shelton and A.J. Wrobel. Jestem Tyrmand, syn Leopolda (“I Am Tyrmand, the Son of Leopold”), Matthew Tyrmand’s new book about his father, was published last year in Polish by the Polish publisher Znak and concerns his discovery as an adult of his father's literary output. The program will begin with an interview conducted by PALA Executive Director Leonard Kniffel and then move into a Q&A.

Leopold Tyrmand (1920-1985) was a famous Polish writer known for his love of jazz, his flamboyant lifestyle, and strong anti-communism and Polish patriotism. He was born into an assimilated Jewish family in Warsaw. He survived the Second World War on fake papers giving him the identity of a Frenchman; he was active in patriotic Polish organizations during the war, and his novel Filip is a semi-autobiographical account of his wartime experiences. Tyrmand became one of the most popular post-war Polish writers, and Diary 1954 and The Man with White Eyes have become canonical works in Poland. Tyrmand was a staff writer for the influential Catholic magazine Tygodnik Powszechny until it was closed by the government for three years in 1953 when it refused to publish an obituary of Stalin. He also became a popularizer of jazz music in Poland, having founded the Jazz Jamboree Festival in Warsaw. In 1967, Tyrmand left Poland for the United States where he wrote for such magazines as the New Yorker. He cofounded the Rockford Institute and was editor in chief of its magazine Chronicles of Culture which was widely lauded in conservative circles.

Matthew Tyrmand was born in 1981 in New York and says his father, who died when Matthew was 4 years old, originally intended to name him Mieczysław. Matthew Tyrmand studied at the University of Chicago. He traded stocks on Wall Street for a decade, and now he has a consulting firm. He is currently working on investing in small and medium-size Polish businesses. He has started to write columns for Super Express, one of the top-selling Polish dailies. He co-runs a nonprofit organization based in Chicago and focused on government spending, transparency and accountability: OpenTheBooks, co-founded by fellow Polish American and 2010 Republican Illinois gubernatorial candidate Adam Andrzejewski.

"My father's Diary from 1954 is one of the best primary source accounts of life under communism in Poland and throughout the Soviet bloc,” says Matthew Tyrmand. “At no point did my father pull punches in describing the intellectual, social, and emotional repression that this totalitarian system wrought on its inhabitants. He called out many apparatchiks and nomenklatura by name and as a result when it was originally published in 1980 in the emigre press it stirred up quite a scandal in Poland given many of the names he cited were still present. Even today many of the progeny of communism's worst figures are still in positions of power rigging the system for their own benefit. My father believed in the truth and would sacrifice everything, including his very sustenance at times, to communicate the way he believed he had the right to. This is a legacy that he, and Poland writ large, has much to be proud of." Read more about his father’s legacy in an interview with Matthew Tyrmand conducted by Filip Mazurczak and published in February by New Eastern Europe.

PALA’s Third Tuesday Polish Book Club continues January 20, 2015 at the Polish Museum of America Library, 984 North Milwaukee Avenue in Chicago with a discussion in Polish of Listy na papierze wyczerpanym by Agnieszka Osiecka and Jeremi Przybora. Discussion leader will be Malgorzata Kot, Director of Polish Museum of American. For more information about both programs, contact her at 773-384-3352 ext. 101, malgorzata-kotpolishmuseumofamerica.org. Polish.

PALA encourages libraries across the country to sponsor book discussion groups. For more information about how to form a “Third Tuesday” Polish Book Club or bring discussion leaders to your library, contact PALA series coordinator Leonard Kniffel at lkniffelsbcglobal.net.

:: Oct 10 2014 ::

Jan Karski’s Mission for Humanity Traveling Exhibition Available to Libraries

“The World Knew: Jan Karski's Mission for Humanity,” a 22-panel traveling exhibition about the life and legacy of Jan Karski, is available to libraries anywhere in the United States and Canada. The exhibition is currently open for a three-and-a-half month run at the Illinois Holocaust Museum and Education Center in Skokie. Two complete copies of the compact panels have been created and require a relatively small room or exhibit space. The Polish American Librarians Association offers assistance in making arrangements, which require only that libraries pay for shipping and a modest handling fee based on service population and budget. PALA has been a supporter of the Jan Karski Educational Foundation, sponsor of the exhibition, since its establishment in 2011.

"We would like very much to send this exhibition to as many libraries as possible through 2015, so cost considerations are negotiable depending on library size, budget, and service population" said Wanda Urbanska, president of the Jan Karski Educational Foundation. "All who see it will be inspired by Karski's legacy of courage and his determination to speak out on behalf of the victims of the Shoah and the bloodbath on the ground in occupied Poland." Karski’s story---with its undercover aspects and high-level diplomatic intrigues---vibrantly brings the struggle of resistance, resilience, and leadership to life. Featuring photographs, source documents and distinctive visual elements about Karski’s life and times, “The World Knew” promotes dialogue about the past and the centrality of genocide prevention in the present.

“Jan Karski refused to be indifferent toward the injustice around him," said Arielle Weininger, Chief Curator of Collections and Exhibitions at the Holocaust Museum, about the late member of the Polish Underground who risked his life to carry eyewitness accounts of the ongoing Holocaust in occupied Poland to western Allies in 1942 and 1943. "His courageous efforts align with the Illinois Holocaust Museum’s mission to combat hatred, prejudice and indifference, and we are incredibly grateful for the opportunity to present ‘The World Knew’ in honor of the 100th year since Jan Karski’s birth.” “The World Knew” debuted in January 2013 at the United Nations for Holocaust Remembrance Week and has since appeared in multiple language versions in Israel, Canada, the University of Wisonsin/Milwaukee, the Polish Museum of American, at the European Parliament in Brussels, and elsewhere. Jan Karski was a Pole by birth, a naturalized American and an honorary citizen of Israel.

The exhibition was organized by the Jan Karski Educational Foundation in partnership with the Polish Ministry of Foreign Affairs and the Polish History Museum in Warsaw. Additional funding was provided by the National Endowment for Humanities. To inquire about bringing the exhibition to your library, contact Leonard Kniffel, PALA Executive Director at lkniffel@sbcglobal.net. Learn more on the foundation website at JanKarski.net.

:: Oct 6 2014 ::

Dominican’s Felice Maciejewski Accepts PALA Board Director Post

Felice Maciejewski, University Librarian of the Rebecca Crown Library at Dominican University in River Forest, Illinois, has accepted a post on the Board of Directors of the Polish American Librarians Association. She has been at Dominican since January 2012 and assumed her PALA duties this September. As part of her role as a Director-at-Large, Maciejewski will orchestrate PALA’s sixth Annual Meeting and Career Development Day, scheduled for February 22 at Dominican.

Prior to becoming a librarian, Maciejewski worked in the Memorial and the Middleton Medical Libraries, University of Wisconsin-Madison. Her first professional librarian position was the Circulation Librarian at Purdue University. She worked at Tulane University in New Orleans for fourteen years, first as the Circulation Librarian and then as Head of Access Services. “I left New Orleans just in the nick of time, two weeks prior to Hurricane Katrina, to take the library directorship at St. Norbert College in De Pere, Wisconsin,” she notes. There she oversaw the planning, construction, and move to the state-of-the-art Mulva Library. She also served as the Library Consultant for the University of Wisconsin System Administration where she coordinated collaborative projects with the libraries throughout the UW system. Maciejewski is active in the American Library Association having served on many LLAMA and ACRL committees and is currently the Vice Chair, Chair-Elect of CARLI.

Born and raised in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, Maciejewski holds an MA in Library and Information Studies from the University of Wisconsin/Madison and a BA from the University of Wisconsin/Milwaukee. She has lived and studied in Heredia, Costa Rica, and in Bologna, Italy.

“We are delighted to welcome Felice to the Board,” said PALA President Ron Stoch. “As a PALA member she has already contributed much to the success of the organization, but her participation as a member of the Board will be a real bonus as we plan the 2015 Annual Meeting for Dominican, where the Graduate School of Library and Information Science has already partnered with PALA to administer the Vera May Zubrzycki Scholarship.”

Maciejewski was appointed to the Board to replace Aldona Salska, a PALA founding member and the first PALA President. Directors-at-Large support the efforts of the Executive Board through their involvement in committees or projects. Directors can initiate projects and, once they are approved by the Board, take the lead in their development and implementation. The Board of Directors meets monthly. Directors may stand for election for an unlimited number of two-year terms.

:: Sept 26 2014 ::

Jan Karski’s Mission for Humanity Traveling Exhibition Available to Libraries

“The World Knew: Jan Karski's Mission for Humanity,” a 22-panel traveling exhibition about the life and legacy of Jan Karski, is available to libraries anywhere in the United States and Canada. The exhibition is currently open for a three-and-a-half month run at the Illinois Holocaust Museum and Education Center in Skokie. Two complete copies of the compact panels have been created and require a relatively small room or exhibit space. The Polish American Librarians Association offers assistance in making arrangements, which require only that libraries pay for shipping and a modest handling fee based on service population and budget. PALA has been a supporter of the Jan Karski Educational Foundation, sponsor of the exhibition, since its establishment in 2011.

"We would like very much to send this exhibition to as many libraries as possible through 2015, so cost considerations are negotiable depending on library size, budget, and service population" said Wanda Urbanska, president of the Jan Karski Educational Foundation. "All who see it will be inspired by Karski's legacy of courage and his determination to speak out on behalf of the victims of the Shoah and the bloodbath on the ground in occupied Poland." Karski’s story---with its undercover aspects and high-level diplomatic intrigues---vibrantly brings the struggle of resistance, resilience, and leadership to life. Featuring photographs, source documents and distinctive visual elements about Karski’s life and times, “The World Knew” promotes dialogue about the past and the centrality of genocide prevention in the present.

“Jan Karski refused to be indifferent toward the injustice around him," said Arielle Weininger, Chief Curator of Collections and Exhibitions at the Holocaust Museum, about the late member of the Polish Underground who risked his life to carry eyewitness accounts of the ongoing Holocaust in occupied Poland to western Allies in 1942 and 1943. "His courageous efforts align with the Illinois Holocaust Museum’s mission to combat hatred, prejudice and indifference, and we are incredibly grateful for the opportunity to present ‘The World Knew’ in honor of the 100th year since Jan Karski’s birth.” “The World Knew” debuted in January 2013 at the United Nations for Holocaust Remembrance Week and has since appeared in multiple language versions in Israel, Canada, the University of Wisonsin/Milwaukee, the Polish Museum of American, at the European Parliament in Brussels, and elsewhere. Jan Karski was a Pole by birth, a naturalized American and an honorary citizen of Israel.

The exhibition was organized by the Jan Karski Educational Foundation in partnership with the Polish Ministry of Foreign Affairs and the Polish History Museum in Warsaw. Additional funding was provided by the National Endowment for Humanities. To inquire about bringing the exhibition to your library, contact Leonard Kniffel, PALA Executive Director at lkniffel@sbcglobal.net. Learn more on the foundation website at JanKarski.net.
:: Sept 16 2014 ::

All of Polonia Reads to Kids” Scheduled at Two Illinois Libraries

Indian Trails Library District and Wood Dale Public Library in Illinois will both host “All of Polonia Reads to Kids” October 5 and October 12 in the second year of this popular program designed to encourage children of the Polish diaspora to read. PALA unveiled the program at its 2013 Annual Meeting at the Polish Museum of America in Chicago and is cosponsoring the event Polish American Librarians Association Immediate Past President Elizabeth Marszalik is Materials Services Manager at Oak Park Public Library and will be directing the day’s events at Indian Trails Public Library. She was instrumental in bringing the reading campaign from Poland to the U.S. and presenting it at Indian Trails last year for some 100 attendees. Joanna Klos, PALA Vice President/President Elect, will head the program at Wood Dale, which is hosting for the first time this year.

“Last year’s success of this program at the Indian Trails Public Library confirmed that there is a great need among Chicago area Polonia for such events,” Says Marszalik. “I found this very inspiring and motivating for promoting this reading campaign at other American libraries serving the Polish community. I strongly believe that the Polish American Librarians Association can truly play very important role in helping Polish-American parents to raise the next generations of bi-lingual readers.”

“I am very excited to bring is this reading initiative to Polish patrons of Wood Dale Public Library as well as its surrounding areas,” says Kols. “The event will also be an opportunity for Polish patrons to discover all of the wonderful resources that public libraries have to offer.” This year the events will take place on October 5, 2-3:30 p.m. at the Wood Dale Public Library, and October 12, 1-2:30 at the Indian Trails Public Library will host the event for the second time from 1-2:30. The first part of the event will include a presentation on the importance of reading by Elizabeth Marszalik and the second part of the event will include a performance of Theatre Workshop’s “Little Stars” under the directorship of Agata Paleczny.

The Indian Trails Library District serves 67,000 residents in the Wheeling, Buffalo Grove, Prospect Heights, Arlington Heights, and Northbrook communities by providing programs, services and resources that enrich and engage the community. The Wood Dale Public Library District serves 13,166 residents of Wood Dale and Bensenville by providing access to library materials and programs to encourage literacy, promote lifelong learning, and experience a sense of community in a welcoming environment.
:: Sept 6 2014 ::

Karski Days Offer Many Ways for Chicagoland PALA Members to Participate

Polish American librarians are urged to participate in “Jan Karski Days in Chicago,” September 18-21. Polish American Librarians Association members who live in the Chicago area can take advantage of a number of special events, leading up to a free two-day international conference at Loyola University, September 19-20, all revolving around the heroism of Jan Karski during World War II.

Organized by Bozena Nowicka McLees, the “Jan Karski 2014 International Conference on Memory and Responsibility” will take place on Loyola’s Lake Shore Campus in Chicago and will feature panel discussions with some 40 leading Polish scholars, as well as a keynote address by U.S. Senator Dick Durbin and the screening of two documentary films, In the Name of Their Mothers about Irena Sendler and Stones for the Rampart, a feature film directed by Robert Glinski. Among the discussion moderators will be Wanda Urbanska, president of the Jan Karski Educational Foundation, Robert Kostro of the Polish History Museum in Warsaw, Samantha Horn of the Auschwitz Institute for Peace and Reconciliation, Jacek Nowakowski of the Holocaust Museum in Washington, Malgorzata Kot of the Polish Museum of America, and Kinga Kosmala of the University of Chicago. The conference concludes with a Polish music and dance program featuring soprano Delia Surratt and pianist Diana Schmuck, dancer Karol Szymanowski, and songs of the 1930s and 1940s performed by the Lira Ensemble.

“Jan Karski Days in Chicago” begin with the September 18 opening of “The World Knew: Jan Karski’s Mission for Humanity,” a must-see exhibition at the Illinois Holocaust Museum & Education Center in Skokie that runs though January 25, 2015. Chicago’s Chopin Theatre will present the premiere of Coming to See Aunt Sophie, a new play written by Arthur Feinsod based on the life of Jan Karski. Show times are September 20 at 2 p.m. and September 21 at 6 p.m, a special performance to be preceded by a conversation with the playwright and the director Dale McFadden. Feinsod is also scheduled to be one of the moderators at the Loyola conference.

“Jan Karski Days in Chicago” celebrate the centennial of his birth. Jan Karski carried out one of the most monumental missions attempted in World War II—a cross-continent trek to inform western leaders in 1942 that the Holocaust was underway. As an emissary for the Polish Underground State, Karski carried classified information from the Resistance on the ground in occupied Poland to the Polish government-in-exile. Only 28 years old at the time, Karski twice entered the Warsaw Ghetto and later penetrated a Nazi transit camp, in disguise, to see Jews being herded to their deaths. With those eyewitness accounts, he met with President Roosevelt to inform him about the on-going genocide. Tragically, the Allies chose not to act on his report.

The Polish American Librarians Association has supported the work of the Jan Karski Educational Foundation since its inception, and PALA Executive Director Leonard Kniffel has served as a volunteer and supporter of the Foundation’s successful efforts to obtain the 2012 Presidential Medal of Freedom posthumously for Karski.

“This is a rare and important opportunity for librarians to learn more about Poland’s role in World War II and about one brave man’s effort to speak truth to power,” says Kniffel. “In an age of never-ending war, at a time when smaller and smaller numbers of eyewitnesses to the Holocaust remain, it is so important for librarians in their role as educators and knowledge managers to keep Karski’s spirit alive.”

The Loyola conference is free, but you must register. Learn more about the exhibition on the Holocaust Museum’s website. Follow all the activities through the Karski Foundation online.

:: Sept 2 2014 ::

Polish Library in Paris Shares Treasures with Visiting PALA Members

The Polish Library in Paris (La Bibliothèque Polonaise de Paris or Biblioteka Polska w Paryżu) opened its doors August 27 to a delegation of five visitors representing the Polish American Librarians Association for a tour through its museum, exhibitions, and rich book collection, all housed in a historic building on Ile Saint-Louis. Library staffers Magdalena Głodek and Ewa Rutkowski led the tour. Participants were Ewa Barczyk and Neal Pease of the University of Wisconsin in Milwaukee, scholar and librarian Maria Witt of Paris, and PALA executive director Leonard Kniffel and photographer Carlon Walker of Chicago.
Malgorzata Kot
Established in 1838 by Polish patriots who fled to France after the defeat of the November Uprising of 1830, the Polish Library in Paris has been the cultural center of Polish emigration to France since the mid-19th century and claims the distinction of being the largest cultural institution representing Poland outside Poland. Głodek and Rutkowski explained that the collection embodies not just Polish history but French history as well, since Poland had been wiped off the map of Europe and the preservation of Polish language and culture rested in large part with Polish expats in France, such as Adam Mickiewicz and Frédéric Chopin. The library has outstanding materials related to these great romantics of the 9th century, a room for each.
Malgorzata Kot
“The Polish Library in Paris is an essential resource for scholars,” said Kniffel, “and I hope our visit helps in some way to forge more connections between American librarians and library collections around the world that preserve the record of the Polish diaspora.”
Malgorzata Kot
:: Aug 17 2014 ::

Three New Members Join PALA Board of Directors

At its August 13 meeting at the Oak Park Public Library, the Board of Directors of the Polish American Librarians Association appointed two PALA members to the board to fill vacant at-large positions: Diane Bartkowiak and Renata Schneider.  Earlier this year, Wanda Jacak was also appointed as a Director. Bartowiak is Senior Library Associate at the American Dental Association (ADA) Library and Archives, Schneider is Metadata Librarian at DePaul University, and Jacak is a retired technical services librarian.

"I am pleased and delighted that all have dedicated themselves to the PALA Board," said President Ron Stoch.  "It is my honor to work with these members who will provide PALA with ideas, energy, and unimaginable contributions!"

The requirements of Board service include attending monthly meetings, which take place at various libraries and cultural institutions around Chicagoland, as well as planning the PALA Annual Meeting and launching individual library initiatives related to Polish history and culture. Board members outside the Chicago area attend via Skype.

:: Jul 30 2014 ::

IFLA Attendees Invited to Meet at Polish Library in Paris

Polish Library in Paris In cooperation with the Polish Library in Paris (La Bibliothèque Polonaise de Paris or Biblioteka Polska w Paryżu), the Polish American Librarians Association is sponsoring a post-IFLA meeting and tour of this unique library located in a historic building on Ile Saint-Louis. The International Federation of Library Associations and Institutions is scheduled to meet August 16-22 in Lyon, France, and the half-day PALA meeting will follow on August 27 in Paris. Polish and Polish American IFLA attendees—as well as anyone interested in learning more about the historical connections between France and Poland—are invited to take advantage of this unique opportunity.

Established in 1838 by Polish patriots who fled to France after the defeat of the November Uprising of 1830, the Polish Library in Paris has been the cultural center of Polish emigration to France since the mid-19th century and claims the distinction of being the largest cultural institution representing Poland outside Poland. Elle s'est établie sur l'île Saint-Louis, en plein cœur de Paris, dans un magnifique immeuble du XVIIème siècle qui abrite des ouvrages et des archives de grande valeur, ainsi qu'une collection importante d'œuvres d'art.Located on beautiful Île Saint-Louis in the heart of Paris, the Polish Library holds valuable and unique books and records, as well as an important art collection.

Renovated and modernized in the early 21st century, the 17th-century building is a haven for readers and researchers who wish to deepen their knowledge of Franco-Polish relations and the history of Poland, says Director C. Pierre Zaleski.La Bibliothèque Polonaise dispose de nombreux souvenirs du plus grand poète romantique polonais du XIXème siècle, Adam Mickiewicz (Musée) et de l'illustre compositeur Frédéric Chopin (Salon). The museum portion of the library has an outstanding collection of materials related to the great romantic poet of the 19th century, Adam Mickiewicz, and composer Frédéric Chopin.

"We are also inviting IFLA colleagues from Poland to this seminar," says Leonard Kniffel, PALA executive director and event organizer. “Information will be available in French, English, and Polish, so language should not be a barrier.” There is no charge, but you do need to register. If you are interested in attending this seminar, contact Kniffel for details and directions: lkniffel@sbcglobal.net.

:: Jul 26 2014 ::

PALA Member Named Managing Director of Polish Museum of America

The Executive Committee and the Board of Directors of the 79-year-old Polish Museum of America (PMA) in Chicago announced July 25 that Polish American Librarians Association founding member Malgorzata Kot has been named PMA Managing Director.

Malgorzata Kot


In a news release, the PMA said Kot had been selected "from a field of qualified candidates" ... "after an intense search and interview process." Kot has been with the PMA for 19 years as Head Librarian, and is respected and known among all segments of Polonia, Poland, and abroad. During her tenure, she developed many cooperative relationships and introduced several innovations to the PMA, the news release went on to say, and "the Museum is an integral part of her professional life, and she has a great vision for the future of the PMA and its mission." A graduate of the Dominican University School of Library and Information Science, she begins her new position September 1.

When asked about what direction the PMA will take under her leadership, Kot stated, "I look to strengthen the PMA’s efforts - working not only with the board and staff, but also jointly with other individuals and organizations who share in the goals and mission of the Polish Museum of America. The PMA will continue to move forward as a center for culture and a reflection of history through its programming and events."

"We are particularly pleased with the selection of Malgorzata Kot as Managing Director of the entire museum because it demonstrates the depth and breadth of the skills she has acquired as a librarian," said PALA President Ron Stoch. "'Gosia' is tireless in her work and has transformed the PMA Library from an old-fashioned facility into the vibrant heart of the Polish Museum. We, her colleagues, applaud her success and this much-deserved recognition of her abilities."

 Contact: PMA@polishmuseumofamerica.org

 
:: Jun 1 2014 ::

The Fourth Partition Director, Producer Talk with PALA Board about Screening Their Film in Libraries

At the invitation of PALA President Ron Stoch, Adrian Prawica and Rafał Muskała, director/editor and associate producer of the documentary film The Fourth Partition, met with the Polish American Librarians Association board May 29 at the Eisenhower Public Library in Harwood Heights, Illinois, to raise awareness of its availability and to encourage libraries to screen the film. “The Fourth Partition is a remarkable film documenting Polish immigration to Chicago from 1870 to 1920,” said Stoch.

The filmmakers explained that at the Dawn of the 20th century, Chicago was the second largest city in the United States with over 2 million residents. It was also the center of Polish culture and political activism in America, while Poland was partitioned between Russia, Austria and Germany. In Chicago, they worked in some of the most dangerous factories and mills in the United States. In their neighborhoods, they built communities, churches, and most of all, aided their beloved Poland in her fight for independence. The "Fourth Partition" title comes from the historical three partitions of Poland, which wiped it off the political map of Europe; the title refers to way these three partitions led to a fourth, when over 4 million Poles immigrated to the United States between 1870 and 1920 in search of a better life.


Prawica and Muskała also talked about the remarkable discoveries they made in libraries and archives, especially the Library of Congress and the archives of Polish newspapers. Board members who had seen the film, which was featured and praised in the 25th Annual Polish Film Festival in America last year, agreed that The Fourth Partition is a stunning and meticulously researched documentary that deserves wider audiences.

The filmmakers and the PALA board urge librarians to consider a screening and discussion of the film at your library. The filmmakers believe the film is suitable for adult audiences as well as young adults aged 13 and up. The Fourth Partition is now available on DVD, from the filmmakers or from sellers such as Amazon. For more information visit the film website.



Translate website to:


PALA Events Calendar





PALA PArtners

Stowarzyszenie Bibliotekarzy Polskich

Polish Museum of America

The Polish Art Center

The Polish Womens Alliance of America
Google Groups
Your Email:

Join PALA group on LinkedIn
© All Rights Reserved 2009-2014 by Polish American Librarians Association  
 Online: 1

Polish American Librarians Association
P.O. Box 7232, Prospect Heights
IL, 60070-7232, US

WorldCat lets people access the collections of libraries worldwide [WorldCat.org]
...